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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
? >> second terms have been tough. even for franklin roosevelt. he started off his second term with his first political loss. here is why second terms are tough. number 1 many presidents often put out their best ideas in their first term. they don't even know necessarily if they are going to get a second crack. secondly, washington can be brutal. you are a little bit battered after a first term. and finally you have been in the washington bubble much too long and you do and everyone is calling you mr. president, and you have all of these handlers, and pollsters and hucksters who always bring you down to the lowest common denominator. my first advice to barack obama, take all of those pollsters and hucksters and second them to a island far, far away for the next four years. >> michael: listening to what you just said and coming off of that, president obama a lot of people think he has been in his own bubble. does that make him unusual? >> it does make him a little bit unusual. and i think maybe there's a chance here. look, if you want to be a great president, you have to ove
's a ritual. there's a lot of celebrities in the crowd. i learned he join us franklin roosevelt as the only president to take the oath four times. he did it over two terms though. >> do you want to explain that? >> well he did it twice the first time because of roberts and then he did it twice this time because of sunday. >> yesterday, roberts read from a piece of paper when he administered the formal oath. >> it's experience. you learn from experience. today it will be how obama tackles the speech. in the past it has been a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to br
tradition of the inauguration speech held at the capitol. that was in 1945 when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. franklin roosevelt, his third inauguration was done at the capitol, but his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this was not the inopportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. he decided on his own to move the inauguration to the south front of the capital. the joint committee was not happy with that decision. the president of the united states can decide above and beyond the date and the time everything else is tradition and can be changed. we reverted back to holding inaugurations at the capitol. we moved them from the east front to the west front and the crowd has been getting bigger and bigger. one reason on the west front is that you can accommodate more people. if you look at the photographs of the last several inaugurations, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was sworn in, the crowds went back to a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, at the crowd gets a little bit further
franklin roosevelt started it in 1933. president obama arrived at the capitol just a few minutes ago. he will soon be announced to the crowd and seated. here are the highlights of today's program. vice president joe biden will take the oath of office first administered by supreme court associate justice sonia sotomayor. >> and then the crowd will be treated to a musical selection by james taylor and then chief justice john roberts will administer the presidential oath of office to mr. obama. that comes just before noon eastern time. now, following the president's inaugural address will be another musical selection. this one by kelly clarkson, and a poem by richard blanco. reverend luis leon will give the benediction followed by beyonce. she's going to sing the national anthem, she had a baby, and she's going to perform at the super bowl. >> not to be upstaged, hampsto pearson is at the capitol. what are you seeing? >> beyonce got a much bigger cheer than i did. it was one of the more electric moments that just happened a few minutes ago when she and jay-z came in. you just missed the int
suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob woodward can speak on this, too-- at the beginning of his time he had both houses of congress in democratic hands. he was turning to something called impoundment saying i'm just not going to spend the money for these bills, these acts, these agencies that democrats are voting for in the house and senate and even in the absence of watergate it's possible that that could have gone to impeachment. >> rose: jon meacham in nashville, thomas jonathan van everyson after a successful first term in which the louisiana purchase was dominant he goes into the second term and what happens? >> well his second inaugural address is largely an attack on the press so he set a tone there. every subsequent president has wanted to do that, ma
, ask what you can do for your country. franklin roosevelt, let me assert my firm believe that the only thing we have to fear is fear it itself. >> what makes a speech a part of history and what does this president need to say tomorrow as he begins his second term joining us are michael gerson speechwriter for president bush and james fallis, speechwriter to president carter. you say you don't write to be etched in granite, but i know that writers know when words ring. when you put words on paper, you think, i can see this, you know, as being what will be taken from this speech. so how do you craft those? >> it's true. the chair richter version is the state of the union address. i think with the inaugural address it's harder because something that registers as a showy line may come off as too showy. i think my sense of inaugural addresses the more they are poem like, the more they are spared, the less they try do the usually better they stand up. >> do you agree, less is more is this. >> yeah. and shorter is better. that helps. when richard nixon was wrikts his second inaugural, he look
of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that's the message on this martin luther king day. and he said when times change, so must we. so i think all of those things are right. and he said, you know, it's not what binds this nation together is not the color
wants. franklin roosevelt in 1937 got in the biggest landslide in presidential history. the congress was more democratic than it had been in that century, has ever been since then, yet he saw the supreme court overruling program after program of his so he decided to come back and ask congress to be able to pack the courts with justices of his own choosing. they slapped it down, had a lot to do with that being a miserable term nap's what barack obama was talking about when he said overreach. >> james, i'm curious about potential powder kegs here. without thinking about things like natural disasters that could come along, what are things that you see as potentially plaguing this second term? does the arab spring and some negative fallout from that terrorism, anything else just -- >> bypass the natural disaster piece so quickly because i think that climb change is something that is not as random as we think it is. so this administration, because i think it owes it to the folk who put them in place, has to be knowledgeable about how our environment is going to unfold in the next several
are attending an inauguration morning service, a tradition started by franklin roosevelt. i'm matt lauer along with savannah guthrie, natalie morales and al roker. >>> we got our first look at the obamas and bidens this morning. after church, the president will head back to the white house, and have a 10:00 coffee with congressional leaders of both parties. and then at 11:55 am the president will take the oath of office, immediately followed by his second inaugural address. >>> after lunch inside the capital, the parade makes its way to the white house, with inaugural floats honoring, among others, the president's birth place, hawaii, and the state of illinois. >>> we saw her in her thom browne coat, starting off her husband's second term, though, with a new look. you noticed the bangs. they have been the talk of town the past few days. we'll take a look at her influence over fashion over the past four years. >> i think there's going to be a lot of talk this morning about the size of the crowd here today and comparing it to the size of the crowd that was here back in 2009, something like 1.8 m
that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean the future. >> one example of this in history is that lincoln at the beginning of his presidency idolized george washington, thought a lot about him, but as the problems got more difficult, as he became in certain ways more radical he was much more interested in people like thomas jefferson. there is that evolution. >> so is there a concern that this president expressed when you had that intimate dinner about looking at history and where other presidents went wrong? >> i think most presidents know that in this off the record dinner. we won't go into a sort of a transcript, but i think you can see very much in terms of what he says in public and what he does that this is someone who, for instance, if you talk about lyndon johnson and the war in vietnam he not only know what is people are talking about but t
the bitter partisan divide that exists in washington in the speech? >> i was just reading franklin roosevelt's second inauguration speech and he was in the a similar situation to barack obama. the economy was struggling. and he did not give a speech that was designed to say, heal the nation's wounds and bring the nation together. he gave a surprisingly polarizing speech saying we have a ways to go. we have got a -- it's not about more for those who already have much. it's about helping those who have nothing. it was called the one-third of the nation speech, because he pointed out, look, we are not at the promised land, i see a nation that has a long way to go. do we quit now. i expect actually, look barack obama's main goal is to democratic house in two years. unless he does that, he will not legislatively anything that he wants. so, if that is -- we are going to see a test of that in this speech and we will see a test of that in the first few days of the administration. if the agenda is polarizing, then we see himming looking at 2015. >> van, do not go too far, when we come back, a rare lo
historian, he will have taken four oaths, puts him at the same league at fdr. >> that is right. franklin roosevelt took the oath four times and bit of a fluke for a president who is limited to two terms to take it four times. that is what happens when you have it last time and repeat it and, of course, we had january 20th fall on sunday which is private ceremony today. >> eric: you have written about the resolution and founding fathers. what do you think they would say if they came back and turn the tv and watched what is going to happen tomorrow? >> i think they would be thrilled that so many american people can watch the peaceful transfer of power under the u.s. constitution. that is really what an inauguration is all about. >> eric: george washington wore ra brown suited and white silk stockings, and he had a sword. can you imagine if the president came out with a sword? and it was the same sense of history and love of our country that has continued through all these years? >> yes, the love of country and patriotism, things are different but obviously washington's first inaugural was
this is an interesting tidbit, president obama will match president franklin roosevelt's president of being sworn in four times because last year chief justice roberts flubbed the official oath and they had to do it again out of an abundance of caution. yesterday he was sworn in. today will be the fourth. so we're going to hear the speech. we think it's going to be hopeful tone. optimistic. the about the has to get right to work. deal with the debt ceiling immigration and of course, we know gun control. agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out for us. >> the only ones i could find that were any newsworthy. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's "the stephanie miller show." ♪ i'm walkin' on sunshine ♪ ♪ i'm walkin' on sunshine ♪ ♪ and it's time to feel good ♪ ♪ hey, all right now ♪ ♪ it's time to feel good ♪ >> stephanie: okay. if you say so. it
of 2007. that tops the performance of president obama's four predecessors. franklin roosevelt tops that business. >>> businesses in new orleans have spent months to celebrate the fans celebrating the super bowl. the big game always provides a huge economic boost to the host city. not everyone who comes as a ticket. now, new orleans attracts a lot of people, expecting 150,000 fans this year. >> as we've been telling you all morning, the san francisco 49ers will be a big part of that party. it will be the sixth super bowl appearance for the 49ers' franchise. janine de la vega is live right now right at the 49ers' team store. we know it will be busy and you have your hands around all of that prized merchandise. >> reporter: the store does not open for a couple of more hours. you can they already have all of this nfc championship gear in the window. of course you, right underneath it, you can see it has the -- of course, right underneath it, you can see it has the member -- memorabilia. the 49ers had a rough first half and was down by 17 points but frank gore scored two touchdowns in t
to make our government a place for what franklin roosevelt called bold, persistent experimentation, a government for our tomorrows, not our yesterdays. let us give this capital back to the people to whom it belongs. [applause] to renew america, we must meet challenges abroad as well as at home. there is no longer a clear division between what is foreign and what is domestic. the world economy, the world environment, the world aids crisis, the world arms race -- they affect us all. today, as an older order passes, the new world is more free but less stable. communism's collapse has called forth old animosities and new dangers. clearly, america must continue to lead the world we did so much to make. while america rebuilds at home, we will not shrink from the challenges nor fail to seize the opportunities of this new world. together with our friends and allies, we will work to shape change, lest it engulf us. when our vital interests are challenged or the will and conscience of the international community is defied, we will act, with peaceful diplomacy whenever possible, with force wh
massive crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> that was a very unique year, 1945. in most normal situations, even if we're in a recession or if we're in a foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> reporter: for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say, i know that i was, you know, a part of american history. and that really means a lot to me. >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington. ♪ why not make lunch more than just lunch? with two times the points on dining in restaurants, you may find yourself asking why not, a lot. chase sapphire preferred. there's more to enjoy. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it end
was the first president to draw massive crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> that was a unique year, and most situations, even if we're in a recession or foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> reporter: for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say i know that i was, you know, a part of american history. and that really means a lot to me. >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but
of office four times as president, franklin roosevelt. >> he was elected four times. >> obama doesn't get to be president for that long. >> bunt this up. when we redid it four years ago, a couple days later, accident have to do it but they just did it just to be on the safe side is that why? >> here's why politics come into t as they thought about whether to redo the oath, they were thinking, look, this is a president who's been accused of not being born in the united states. people are really looking for reasons to question his authentici authenticity. so they thought, look, let's get rid of this problem at the beginning. let's redo the oath there is the photograph there in the mac room in the white house, done at 7:00 in the evening on january 21st and they eliminated the problem but one of the reasons they felt to deal with the problem is they felt his political opposition, they might file a lawsuit they would be in court. they didn't want to have that sort of uncertainty. >> did it, got over with and that is that he will be in the blue room today administering the oath at the white ho
a kind of speech that franklin roosevelt did which he has studied for his second inaugural which was a pretty tough speech. >> and what's the first test in your view, john? whether the president -- he'll talk bipartisanship tomorrow, but will he act bipartisan? >> i mean, it's fascinating because some of the proposals he's made that have already come under fire, for example, reporting republican chuck hagel as secretary of defense has not gone over well with republicans, especially the neoconservative crowd. so that outreach which traditionally would be bridge building has actually in this environment created a lot of blowback. and the question is whether policy moves like immigration reform, can they really cobble together any kind of bipartisan coalition? bush backed it, but will it now mean republicans support it? >> when we're talking with melody barnes, does he pick gun control or immigration? gun control being an issue that's highly polarized. immigration where you've got marko ruma marco rubio with ideas that jibe with the president. >> the thing about immigration, all dem
this. she became a liberal spokesperson for the roosevelt family. when franklin roosevelt couldn't go as far as he wanted to, he would say, listen to my wife and that's where my heart lies. in another case where it can backfire hillary clinton in the first clinton administration. >> a crucial role michelle obama played giving that speech which was very well received. >> she helps to humanize him and provide that behind had scenes look at who he is and what he's trying to accomplish. she can relate to people on a level of shared experiences. she's a working woman. she understands raising kids and juggling work and family. and when people can hear from her in that sort of long form format and really have that conversation with her, it really electroifies the room and i think that's what helped changed the dialogue in 2008. >> in that speech that she gave at the convention, i think people forgot, you know, democrats were really a little bit down. she got out there and when she spoke, that wasn't just one of the best speeches of a first lady, that was one of the best speeches in american
times since what president? >> franklin roosevelt. >> all right. wins the prize? >> let me give you this. how about this? he is the first president, first democratic president since franklin roosevelt to be elected with more than 50% twice. he is also the first president since dwight eisenhower to be elected twice with more than 51%. >> there you go? >> ranken was above. a mandate. >> a second term. will we see any difference in his second term? what's the second term going to look like? i know you are talking about that with some folks in columbia? >> i will be up at the university of district of columbia with a great event organized by progressive democrats of america, national nurses united, communication workers, a lot of unions bringing together all sorts of folks. keith ellison will be there as well as a lot of other folks talking about this. i think obama can be different. the question is: will he? >> he was showing good signs? >> the transition has been one of the better trigs in modern history. he took on the whole fiscal cliff thing and was strong
. >> reporter: franklin delano roosevelt lifted people's spirits too. he used the first of his four inaugural addresses to start the healing of a nation badly broken from the great depression. >> the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> reporter: more than a generation later when nearly 2 million people crowded onto the national mall to see the swearing in of the first african-american president, it was a moment of national unity. but as this historian notes when the president gives his second inaugural address, the magic for the most part is lost. >> they are not as impressive not as compelling as first inaugural spices. >> don baer who was a speech righter for clinton says the most recent speeches whether by eisenhower, fdr, reagan clinton, or george w. bush don't soar to the same heights as they're measured against the reality of the first four years. >> well the first inaugural is sort of like a new baby right? there's so much expectation and potential. the second is like an adolescent, a teenager. we know it didn't quite turn out exactly the way we hoped.
for the fourth time since franklin roosevelt. >> jennifer: amazing. >> john: very true. that's a piece of trivia that won't be matched any time soon. >> jennifer: while we're watching the inaugustral procession, the first president to actually ride in a bulletproof car was lyndon johnson in 1965, michael shure. the first president to ride in a car at all, excuse me, david shuster, are you there? the first president to ride in a ceremony in a car was warren harding back in 1921. so shuster, can you see from where you are. you've got a unique spot looking back at the capitol. can you see any of that happening? >> yeah, we can see over to constitution avenue. can see the crowds blocked off. we can see the monitor. what i wanted to say about the motorcade is a couple of things. first of all, in order to prepare pennsylvania avenue for this path, they removed something like 25 different stoplights that were on poles and the other thing that they do as part of security is early this morning, the electric company and gas company will go manhole cover by manhole cover, prop them open, make sure nothing
on their heels. overreach is a common risk of presidents in their second term. classic example is franklin roosevelt wins the election, tries to change the supreme court. it all comes tumbling down. the president has to be conscious of that. divide republicans between those who believe the party has to try to rebuild itself, rebuild the national majority and those that are locked into a staunchly conservative view? >> even with the supreme court's decision, would you expect that it will still play a large role in the second term? >> it's absolutely critical for him to be able to make this work. his re-election means republicans in congress will not be able to repeal it. >> and next year is when we really start to feel the impact. >> absolutely. he is still in hand-to-hand combat with governors in particular in implementing it. a number of republican governors have refused to set up what's required, and the public component of expansion of coverage. there's lots of challenges of moving 30 million more people into an insurance-based system. so that could mean enormous implementation challeng
little facts about our inaugural weather. wettest inaugural, franklin d. roosevelt. 1.77 inches of rain picked up during the inaugural swearing-in. almost .7. then the snowiest inaugural, william taft, 9.8 inches of heavy snow, drifting snow, strong winds. almost blizzard-like conditions. clouding up later. 30% chance of afternoon snowshowers. temperatures in the mid 30s to the low 40s. by the afternoon, we're looking for a high of 47 degrees. that's what's going on around the country. here's what's happening in your neck of the woods. >> good morning. right on the mall, temperatures are a little above freezing now. generally in the mid 30s. elsewhere, still below freezing in many locations in the rural areas. it's in the upper 20s to near 30. we have clouds coming through. a mostly cloudy day with highs reaching the mid and upper 40s in washington. elsewhere, highs in the upper 30s and low 40s. windy and cold tonight. maybe some passing snowshowers late afternoon into the evening that could leave a dusting. windy and cold weather tomorrow >> and that's your latest weather. savannah? >>
to draw massive crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. the story by douglas brinkley. >> that was an unusual year in 1945. most situations, even in a recession or we're in a foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> reporter: for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i will be able to look back on all of this and say i know that i was a part of american history. and that really means a lot to me. >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like
: only two presidents have been sworn in on two separate occasions, franklin d. roosevelt and barack obama because of what happened in 2009. swearing in at noon eastern time today for the president, tomorrow is the public ceremony. vice-president joe biden will be sworn in within the next 10 minutes to 15 minutes from his residence. the flag in the center of your screen is the same one used in his ceremonial office. you can see two paintings. one is lincoln delivering his second inaugural address. one of the more memorable second inaugural addresses in history. guest: that is exactly right. the end of the civil war, leaving it the country at a press of this for which direction they could go. in his words, now the story is none, it set the groundwork for what he envisioned. historians have argued about how it was carried out and what may have been one of the world's greatest what ifs, if he had not been assassinated a few days later. let just a couple of miles to the white house, where the vice president and his official residence is located. the first vice-president of the president
to franklin roosevelt's overreaching and historic change of the politics of the country? >> you see the congressional leaders for the country. steny hoyer, and we just saw them go to the capitol. >> we saw janet napolitano, and security making their way in. you were talking about lincoln in the course of this presidency. i want to pick up the pictures of him because they are among the most startling. he lost 50 pounds. he was about 150 pounds weighing in, at 6'4". >> the picture on the right side, abraham lincoln, only 56 years old. look at those eyes. of course, the lincoln memorial there. martin luther king in the shadow, gave that speech 50 years ago. and there, we see, as you see more -- i think that's katy perry there. >> i believe it is. >> on the steps of the capitol. along with john mayer. we're going to come back. she performed at the kids' concert saturday night. we're going to hear from beyonce, and kelly clarkson, and james taylor, at this ceremony. they're having fun. probably tweeting that out. >> tweeting immediately. >> we'll be right back with much more of our inaug
anyone any. only franklin roosevelt has been sworn in four times before in the united states history. and roosevelt is elected. and inspect the future. >> you saw the live picture. we saw the president with his wife. his two children and supreme court justice john roberts. the one who is officiate fog. this is a private inauguration. and the official much larger one is happening tomorrow. tori campbell is outside and covering both of those for us. it is only the seventh tomb in history that a president has to do the private swearing in ceremony because the constitution requires they be sworn in before noon. and it happened efficiently. it has to happen by noon. as he is now inaugurated and the official one will start tomorrow. >> we look at the exterior shot from the white house. you must think. and will he bring up of popular issues and we have the state of union coming up naylor february 12th. will he steer and quite difficult visive right now out of the christmas break and what was going on in congress. and we will see. what the president has to say tomorrow. it will be interestin
her husband franklin delano roosevelt was president, eleanor roosevelt was the first, first lady to hold her own press conference and these press conferences came with a catch, for women reporters only. women were typically barred from the presidential press conferences, and so mrs. roosevelt only allowed women to attend hers. nearly 70 years after fdr, and we see a lot of women covering the white house, but among the five major networks, four still employ men as the chief white house correspondent. so folks who sit on the front row in the white house briefing room are still mostly fellows including our own chuck todd. and jessica yellin and brianna keel er are from cnn and joining them on the front row is julia pace. i want to come back to the white house to talk about this question, because if women in the room matter and we are all critiquing the president's picture, the fact is that the room is full of a lot of guys, too. >> we were on the campaign trail together, nia, and i and there were a lot of women in the campaign bus, and it was not boys on the bus anymore. this is a t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)